Welcome to St. Jude's Cure4Kids for Parents!

We have provided resources tailored to parents and care-takers on general health, cancer, and healthy living topics like tobacco control, sun exposure, proper nutrition, and physical activity. We hope you find the resources informative and useful to help your family better understand cancer and live a healthier life. We invite you to visit the kids' site and experience for yourself the excitement of this interactive learning environment.

For General Health

  1. A service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health, MedlinePlus is a directory of information to help answer health questions. MedlinePlus brings together information from various government agencies and health-related organizations. There are numerous resources on cancer. May be particularly useful for those with healthcare or scientific background due to the scientific complexity of the papers.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Information and resources on health and safety topics from diseases to emergency preparedness to healthy living to travel.
  3. The Quick Guide to Healthy Living provided by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services provides loads of information on preventative medicine and ways to work toward a healthier lifestyle. Their Personal Health Tools allow you to find motivation and keep track of your progress.
  4. Healthfinder.gov is a government website that provides resources and tools for the lay public about staying healthy.

For Children's Health

  1. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)- CDC information on physical activity for children, adults, and seniors. Also includes a page just for girls called Powerful Bones. Powerful Girls and a page for kids aged 9-13 called Bam! Body and Mind that explains the benefits of physical activity and gives some examples. Bam! Body and Mind also explains the benefits of good nutrition, gives kid-friendly healthy recipes, and provides games to help kids make healthy choices. The CDC also provides a page about reaching and maintaining healthy weight for adults and children with guides for reducing calorie intake, planning meals, assessing your weight, physical activity, and more.
  2. A Partnership Program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the SunWise program is a school-based education program dedicated to developing sun-safe behaviors in the public. They have good basic information as well as a list of action steps to reduce risk of overexposure to UV rays. They also have a site just for KIDS!
  3. SmallStep is really two websites provided by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for adults and teens or for kids. Here you will find tips on health and nutrition topics, a tool for tracking activity, multimedia, and research about food and activity. On the kids' site, you will find games, activities, videos, a quiz, and answers to frequently asked questions. All resources are provided in both English and Spanish.
  4. Kids.gov provides materials for kids in both elementary and middle school as well as for educators. Topics range from careers to health and fitness to math and money.
  5. Healthy Youth is a CDC site that provides information on many health topics including tobacco, nutrition, physical activity and more.
  6. Unites States Department of Agriculture(USDA)-The Food and Nutrition Information Center provides resources to the public on various government agencies related to nutrition. Topics range from dietary guidance to diet and disease to food safety. Research results are reported alongside news articles and answers to frequently asked questions. MyPyramid for Kids is designed for elementary school children. There are numerous teacher resources including lesson plans, an interactive game, and a MyPyramid for Kids Poster. The messages included in the materials are designed to help children 6 to 11 years old make healthy eating and physical activity choices. The Food and Nutrition Service provides resources on various nutrition assistance programs throughout the U.S.
  7. GirlsHealth.gov provides information for parents and caregivers as well as for girls. Here you will find information on smoking, nutrition, fitness, tanning, and many other topics.
  8. U.S. Food and Drug Administration(FDA) website provides information mostly on food safety, dietary supplements, and labeling and nutrition. Includes resources for kids and teens that include coloring books, quizzes, information on careers in food science, information on cosmetics, and other student resources.

General Information on Cancer

  1. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is constituent of the National Institutes of Health, one of eight agencies that compose the Public Health Service in the Department of Health and Human Services in the United States. The NCI website contains a variety of cancer-related information for the general public, patients, and health professionals. An introduction to cancer is covered as well as a comprehensive tutorial provided through NCI's Understanding Cancer Series.
  2. Healthfinder.gov is provided by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Here you can find resources on an assortment of health topics pulled from over 1,600 government and non-profit organizations. There are 204 websites referenced here on cancer.
  3. The National Institutes for Health provides information on many health topics including cancer. Here you will find information specific to each type of cancer.

Information on Tobacco

  1. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) CDC tobacco facts, recourse, and media. Also includes a page for youth tobacco prevention.
  2. NOVA Online Presents the anatomy of a cigarette, the chemistry of combustion, and a very good introduction to the effects of nicotine on the body.
  3. Parents. The Anti-Drug Website designed just for parents. Gives extensive overviews of many different drugs, including tobacco. Also provides parenting advice, ways to tell if your child may be using, and other resources including news, media, data, and downloadable guides.
  4. Above the Influence ads, website, and commercials are created for the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign, a program of the US Office of National Drug Control Policy. This campaign is inspired by what teens have said about their lives, and how they deal with the influences that shape their decisions.
  5. The International Union Against Cancer has built treatobacco.net an international resource center with new research, news, and other resources in Arabic, Chinese, Czech, English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. The site contains five main subsites: Demographics and Health Effects, Efficacy, Health Economics, Policy, and Safety.

Information on Sun Exposure

  1. A Partnership Program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the SunWise program is a school-based education program dedicated to developing sun-safe behaviors in the public. They have good basic information as well as a list of action steps to reduce risk of overexposure to UV rays. They also have a site just for KIDS!
  2. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) CDC information on skin cancer risk factors, prevention, screening, statistics, and CDC policies. Also includes a page about protecting children from the Sun.
  3. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is constituent of the National Institutes of Health, one of eight agencies that compose the Public Health Service in the Department of Health and Human Services in the United States. The NCI website contains a variety of cancer-related information for the general public, patients, and health professionals. A lot of information is given on skin cancer prevention, treatment, and myths.
  4. SunSmart Program run out of Victoria Australia provides the public with resources and news on skin cancer, UV radiation, sun protection, tanning, and vitamin D.
  5. The World Health Organization provides good information on ultraviolet radiation and its effects on human health. Also provided are factsheets, press releases, international recommendations, publications in full text, and answers to frequently asked questions.

Information on Exercise and Fitness

  1. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is constituent of the National Institutes of Health, one of eight agencies that compose the Public Health Service in the Department of Health and Human Services in the United States. The NCI website contains a variety of cancer-related information for the general public, patients, and health professionals. A lot of information is provided regarding energy balance: weight and obesity, physical activity, and diet. A factsheet is given titled, Physical Activity and Cancer: Questions and Answers and another titled, Obesity and Cancer: Questions and Answers.
  2. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) CDC information on physical activity for children, adults, and seniors. Also includes a page just for girls called Powerful Bones. Powerful Girls and a page for kids aged 9-13 called Bam! Body and Mind that explains the benefits of physical activity and gives some examples.
  3. Eat Smart. Play Hard. Government plan for healthy lifestyles among families in the United States. Here you will find resources for tracking progress, making it easier, and other tools to help your family succeed in the program.
  4. We Can! Ways to Enhance Children's Activity and Nutrition A program offered by The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute in collaboration with the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and the National Cancer Institute. Provides resources for parents and caregivers of children aged 8-13 to help children maintain a healthy body weight. Families Finding the Balance-A Parent Handbook, provided by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is a guide to help parents understand healthy weight and increase the activity level and good nutrition of children.
  5. Pause to Play is a website maintained by the government of Ontario, Canada designed to encourage kids to play sports. It allows viewers to explore 21 different sports, learn how to play and about the skills involved, read about the history, and hear stories from professional or Olympic athletes. There are also two interactive games that help children understand the connection between nutrition and energy to play and about how muscles are used in different sports.

Information on Nutrition

  1. Fruits and Veggies Matter Provided by the CDC to encourage the public to increase consumption of fruits and vegetables. Includes recipes, tips, interactive tools, questions and answers, publications, and a personal nutrition calculator.
  2. MyPyramid.gov Provided by the USDA and dedicated solely to helping the public understand the government's dietary recommendations. Includes separate pyramid explanations for preschoolers, moms, kids, and the general public. Also includes a menu planner, podcasts, animations, and public service ads. Provides tools, tips, and other resources to help you plan, track, and meet your dietary goals.
  3. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is constituent of the National Institutes of Health, one of eight agencies that compose the Public Health Service in the Department of Health and Human Services in the United States. The NCI website contains a variety of cancer-related information for the general public, patients, and health professionals. A lot of information is provided regarding energy balance: weight and obesity, physical activity, and diet. A factsheet is given titled, Physical Activity and Cancer: Questions and Answers and another titled, Obesity and Cancer: Questions and Answers.
  4. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)- CDC information on nutrition for children and adults. The site also includes a page just for youth nutrition called Healthy Youth! and a page for kids aged 9-13 called Bam! Body and Mind that explains the benefits of good nutrition, gives kid-friendly healthy recipes, and provides games to help kids make healthy choices. They also provide a page about reaching and maintaining healthy weight for adults and children with guides for reducing calorie intake, planning meals, assessing your weight, physical activity, and more.
  5. Unites States Department of Agriculture(USDA)-The Food and Nutrition Information Center provides resources to the public on various government agencies related to nutrition. Topics range from dietary guidance to diet and disease to food safety. Research results are reported alongside news articles and answers to frequently asked questions. MyPyramid for Kids is designed for elementary school children. There are numerous teacher resources including lesson plans, an interactive game, and a MyPyramid for Kids Poster. The messages included in the materials are designed to help children 6 to 11 years old make healthy eating and physical activity choices. The Food and Nutrition Service provides resources on various nutrition assistance programs throughout the U.S.
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About St. Jude Cure4Kids for Kids

The St. Jude Cancer Education for Children Program is an educational outreach initiative of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. It helps school children, their parents and teachers understand the basic science and treatment of cancer. Through the use of age-appropriate content, the program focuses on three main objectives:

  1. addressing common misconceptions about childhood cancer,
  2. instilling healthy habits in children that can help prevent the development of adult cancer, and
  3. increasing children's overall interest in science and scientific careers.

All educational on-site activities are led by St. Jude faculty and staff. All the educational material was developed by a multi-disciplinary team composed of St. Jude faculty and staff with the collaboration of national experts. St. Jude works with schoolteachers and administrators to implement this program free of charge.